Office Ergonomics App!

Expert ergonomic advice at your fingertips! We are excited to offer our Office Ergonomics Workstation adjustment app for free!
(click app store below).

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We are preparing to launch a webinar series. Sign-up for our newsletter to stay in the loop! In the meantime we'd love to hear from you, let us know if you have a topic in mind! Please contact us via email info@ewiworks.com or phone:
1 (780) 436-0024
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Industrial

Psst…can we talk? Mental health in the workplace and initiating change

​Mental health problems or illness is one of the top three drivers leading to short or long term disability claims in Canada, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of mental health issues in the workplace needs to be a top priority for all. Learn to recognize signs of mental illness in a co-worker, friend or even yourself with these helpful tips.
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Ergonomics in the Food Industry

Ergonomics in the Food Industry
Despite Alberta’s Recession, Alberta’s food production industry is growing. According to the Alberta Government, “Alberta’s food and beverage industries form the province’s second largest manufacturing sector, employing approximately 25,500 people with sales of more than 13 billion.” Where does ergonomics fit into this? Annie Barnwell, Ergonomist at EWI Works, recently presented her talk on “Ergonomics in the Food Industry: Methods to improve Return on Investment & Reduce Injuries” to the Alberta Food Processors Association. Here are the highlights of her talk.
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Work as Therapy—Why Early Return to Work is Valuable

Work as Therapy—Why Early Return to Work is Valuable
​In the past, it was believed that an injured worker should not return to work until they are capable of full duties. However, it is now known that early return to work with modified or transitional duties is valuable to the worker and the employer.
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Reviewing categories of physical demands for occupational tasks

In most any industry in North America it is common for employers to use Physical Demands Analysis (PDA) or Job Demands analysis (JDA) documents as part of their occupational health and safety program, and as a registry of physical exertions for job activities. Ultimately, a PDA or JDA can be used to determine the requirements and skills needed from personnel during hiring, identify key actions for jobs, and identify risks posed during various jobs/tasks.

A PDA or JDA is often used to review accidents and injuries to employees. The details of the physical job requirements can help to review specific cases, provide information for disability managers and health care professionals assessing injury and return to work, and identify where modifications to work are possible to allow employees with limitations/injuries to safely return to their jobs.

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Cold exposure in outdoor work: Pain in the fingers

Last week, Alberta was treated to an unexpected early snowfall. While we are fortunate that winter conditions have reverted back to a typical, warm, Western Canadian September we were reminded of the coming winter conditions and the impact they have on our work operations. In outdoor construction work and trades-person work in cold winter conditions, there are a number of discomforts and issues that can be aggravated by the cold.

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Taking a look at ergonomics risk factors in construction work

Taking a look at ergonomics risk factors in construction work

Construction work is one of the most common and lucrative fields of employment among trades people and labourers. It has been well established that work in this field is associated with ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders, and evaluating exposures to various risk factors throughout this work is important.

Although, accurate assessment of exposures can be difficult to gather without proper expertise and skills.

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